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Gicleè Prints

All photographs shown in the galleries can be purchased as signed, limited edition giclée prints. The quality of the photographic prints are far greater than the small digitized images depicted in the galleries.
Ordering is fast and easy. Please send e-mail for immediate pricing information. S&H is extra and depends on the size of the print and distance shipped.
Prints are available in a variety of finishes: glossy, matte, watercolor, or canvas.


About Gicleè Printing

The Definition : Giclee (zhee-klay) - The French word "giclée" is a feminine noun that means a spray or a spurt of liquid. The word may have been derived from the French verb "gicler" meaning "to squirt".

The Term : The term "giclee print" connotes an elevation in printmaking technology. Images are generated from high resolution digital scans and printed with archival quality inks onto various substrates including canvas, fine art, and photo-base paper. The giclee printing process provides better color accuracy than other means of reproduction All prints are made with the finest archival materials. Digitally mastered giclée images ensure the sharpest, most saturated photographs. Giclée's are printed on archival glossy paper, museum quality parchment, or artist's canvas. Prints are mounted on acid-free foam-board and come matted with the finest acid-free mat board available.

The Quality : The quality of the giclee print rivals traditional silver-halide and gelatin printing processes and is commonly found in museums, art galleries, and photographic galleries.


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 © 2007 Dotty Waxman Photography. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any form is strictly prohibited.

© 2008 Dotty Waxman Photography. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form is strictly prohibited.

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